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Truth is out there but it's being hidden, UFO expert says

Mary Rodwell and her sceptic son Chris have featured in an SBS documentary about UFOs.
Mary Rodwell and her sceptic son Chris have featured in an SBS documentary about UFOs. Contributed

YOU'RE driving down a long road at night, towing a boat on the back with your father beside you.

Then a big, bright blue light appears just over the car to the right-hand side. It just sort of blinks on.

You notice it immediately; turn to your father for assurance that you aren't imagining it.

He turns around and looks. He can see it too but, unlike you, he wants to drive faster and get away.

The orb follows the car for a few minutes before it shoots off into the distance.

You do not speak because neither you nor he can explain what it is you have seen.

But for you, this is just the beginning of a series of paranormal encounters that make you begin to question your sanity.

This is the true story of Giles Campbell.

A former geneticist acclaimed within his field and working at CSIRO, science had provided every answer he had  searched for in life - until he began having regular encounters with aliens, when empirical evidence would no longer suffice.

Depression encumbered him as his isolation grew. After all, who do you talk to about alien encounters without having them doubt your sanity?

Agnes Water resident Mary Rodwell is the answer.

She is a ufologist, hypnotherapist, leading researcher, consultant and the founder and principal of the Australian Close Encounter Resource Network.

"This is what I've learnt. We actually all have the ability to perceive a broader spectrum of reality, but not all of us own it, because we are told unless it is solid, unless you can touch it and feel it, it's not real," she said.

"There are lots of things you can't touch and feel that are real. You can't say what shape love is, or what it is."

Mary Rodwell says the form of aliens are varied.
Mary Rodwell says the form of aliens are varied. Lexussk

The other worldly journey Ms Rodwell has embarked upon is remarkable and captivating.

Coming from a counselling background, it began when a middle-aged man, described by Ms Rodwell as articulate and intelligent, sought an open mind to talk him through an alien encounter.

From that point on, her skills have been in high demand.

These days, she jets across the world, answers emails from as far away as South Africa, England and the US, and appears as a keynote speaker for international alien conferences.

"It's been a journey," she admits. "Hundreds and hundreds of people telling me the same thing, right across the board.

"We're talking about people with credentials, not fitting in with their science backgrounds." 

A client base of 2000 spanning the globe is enough recognition for Ms Rodwell to understand that her purpose and occupation is warranted.

The Agnes Water resident has publicly argued the topic of extra-terrestrials in Oxford University debates against physicists.

What may come as a real surprise, however, is that she wins.

The truth is out there - but we're not being told

Mrs Rodwell places an extremely convincing argument before anyone willing to give her their time.

But perhaps the greatest argument is the testimony of her clients - children from as young as four, doctors, lawyers and farmers who seek Ms Rodwell's time and expertise.

And she doesn't care if you don't agree with her. 

Giles Campbell felt alone before he sought the counsel of ufologist Mary Rodwell.
Giles Campbell felt alone before he sought the counsel of ufologist Mary Rodwell. Ebony Battersby

"Primarily, this isn't about belief. Most people come to me and they don't believe in aliens until they experience it," she said.

"There is a truth embargo on this planet. You are not told the truth; the public have been lied to for 60 years, probably even more.

"Astronauts have confirmed the presence of aliens, even two US presidents have confessed, Reagan and Carter."

Ms Rodwell is adamant that evidence of extra-terrestrials surrounds us; the populous being blissfully ignorant.

Teflon, digital chips and night vision are all tangible products of reverse engineering, according to Ms Rodwell, carefully concealed by governments to be used for their own good in circumstances such as military conflict and commercial enterprise.

"Look at how far we've come in such a short amount of time, a lot of that is reverse engineering. We didn't get here alone," she said.

"The evidence is there, people just have to look."

Strikingly, Ms Rodwell is spot-on about one thing. The people who seek her services have nothing to gain other than peace of mind.

And that is exactly the gift she gave to Giles Campbell.

Mr Campbell describes Ms Rodwell as a grounding ear during a time of severe displacement, when he felt his life was spinning out of control.

"I felt like I was in the wrong place doing the wrong thing. Which was a shock to me, because I was really happy in my job, and fairly well respected at work," he said.

"I worked damn hard and I was good at what I did, but I felt really unfulfilled all of a sudden.

"Everything in my life changed, science no longer made any sense to me. I took off, resigned from CSIRO.

"It's like you root yourself into a belief system, and then it's ripped away from you.

"I had no point of reference for any of this. I had actually spent quite a lot of time taking the piss out of people who said they had seen stuff like this.

"I just thought they were all drug addicts or delusional, and that was my bad judgement call."

Apparitions continued for years to come.

"I was in my room, the first thing I think is, 'Here we go again'. It's 2.30am and I start thinking, 'Is this a dream?' It looked like a praying mantis, sitting right next to my bed," he said.

"I can see its skeleton underneath its skin. It has a blue, purple glow to it. It is motionless, just staring at me, I spend five or six minutes observing, I could see beads of light moving through its veins."

With a flash, it was gone.

The figure Mr Campbell saw that evening is what he describes as "the most f***ing awesome thing I've ever seen in my life".

A paradigm shift took place in Mr Campbell's life from that point forward.

It was a realignment of what was important, the dimensions that encapsulated him and his outlook on what was possible.

It is this transition that Ms Rodwell is assisting thousands of people with.

I can see its skeleton underneath its skin. It has a blue, purple glow to it. It is motionless, just staring at me, I spend five or six minutes observing, I could see beads of light moving through its veins.

"For me now it's about supporting all of these people who are questioning their sanity," she said.

"They (alien encounters) can be anything from humanoids to energy, sometimes they look quite insect-like, reptilian-like, some look like cat-feline type beings. There is a broad range."

Ms Rodwell is no longer surprised to listen in graphic detail to recounts of night terrors, nosebleeds, strange marks on bodies, or newly found abilities.

"Some people will find that they are suddenly really good at physics. Or get absolutely passionate about a topic but don't know what's driving them," she said.

"I've even had a child translate a script for me. She was looking through a book, and said to her mother, 'I can read that', then she came out with the language that it was.

"This is a seven-year-old girl. You don't do that with a hallucination."

Mrs Rodwell believes governments over history have not known enough about extra-terrestrial beings to disclose information to the public.

She insists that lies are now so embedded into society, it's at the point of no return, and besides, governments were benefitting from withholding such information.

Whether or not you agree, it doesn't matter to her. But if you are a skeptic, let's hope you never need Mary Rodwell's help.

Topics:  agnes water, aliens, editors picks, mary rodwell, ufo


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