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Breech delivery brought twin fears for premature delivery

SPECIAL DELIVERY: Fourth time mum Tammica Whaling was grateful for the help from Adam Gett (right), Brittany Aitchison (left) and Cleveland Marcum, with the arrival two healthy now 12-day-old twins, Jobe (left) and Jackson. Mum and twins are still in the Mackay Base Hospital.
SPECIAL DELIVERY: Fourth time mum Tammica Whaling was grateful for the help from Adam Gett (right), Brittany Aitchison (left) and Cleveland Marcum, with the arrival two healthy now 12-day-old twins, Jobe (left) and Jackson. Mum and twins are still in the Mackay Base Hospital. Louise Starkey

TAMMICA Whaling was faced with a pregnant woman's worst nightmare.

At 33-weeks her waters broke, and within minutes she went into labour in her lounge room.

Emergency services were on their way but the babies were eager to "get out".

However, Ms Whaling was worried.

Not only was she expecting twins, but two weeks prior she had been told one of them would be a breech birth.

"Delivering breech was horrific," she said. "It didn't hurt any more, I was just worried he would have a broken arm or leg, or something was going to happen to me, and my other children were watching."

While she waited for the ambulance, her three other children and mother gathered towels, to prepare for the arrival of Jobe and Jackson Curtis.

Critical care paramedic Adam Gett said he heard the call for assistance over the radio while attending to another job close by.

"I jumped in my car, pulled into the place at Eimeo and went up the stairs with all of my gear," he said.

"I did a diving catch and basically caught the first one that came out, head-first."

"He was pink and crying, so I wrapped and passed him to Cleve, another paramedic, who had just walked through the door.

"I turned around to do the second baby and his legs were already out."

"I said to mum, 'Push again' and the rest of the body delivered, except for an arm which was trapped over the face."

The twins were born two minutes apart and Mr Gett said being born premature was what why they had been delivered safely.

"If they were full-term, the heads could have easily become stuck," he said. "If you then start touching the body, they'll take a breath when the head isn't out."

It was not just a memorable experience for Ms Whaling.

Out of seven deliveries, the arrival of Jackson was the first breach birth for Mr Gett.

Topics:  childbirth editors picks home birth labour premature birth twins


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