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Job seekers want to talk to real people, not robots

RISE OF THE MACHINES: Automated job recruitment is not proving successful for many job seekers.
RISE OF THE MACHINES: Automated job recruitment is not proving successful for many job seekers. Thinkstock

WE ARE all being prepared for that time in the not-too-distant future when robots start pinching our jobs.

Barring a Terminator-style revolution, we'll be enjoying a world where robots take on the dirty, unpleasant jobs, leaving humans to take on the tasks requiring more empathy and emotion.

While our mechanical friends are starting to dominate some industries (manufacturing, for example), there are already cases where robotic isn't best.

Ironically, one of the most prominent is recruitment.

Removing the human aspect of the job application process is proving a major stumbling block for applicants, who increasingly are being met with automated emails, or worse, silence.

Mike Haywood, founder of productivity and collaboration platform LiveHire said the company's research had found online job boards to often be an ineffective means of job hunting.

"The current reactive job application process makes people feel rejected, incompetent and depressed,” Mike said.

"If you want to get a job today, you need to talk to a human, not a machine or computer that puts a CV into a database and you're never heard from again.”

"Successful job applicants are joining talent communities and also leveraging their own personal network.”

The national survey of 3000 people showed the online boards were the most commonly used platform for job seekers (70%), but previous reports show less than a quarter of applicants were successful using online job boards.

Respondents indicated the effort put into applying for roles through job boards was met with little to no human acknowledgement, with automated emails or no response.

Mr Haywood said job boards created a process where the sheer amount of application data could become too difficult for HR departments to cope with, with CVs in many cases never viewed by a human, but scanned and rejected or accepted based on certain words in the document.

According to the survey, 61% of respondents said they rarely or never heard back from companies they'd applied to.

"Very rarely does an applicant get to speak to a human, let alone even get a response. The research shows job boards are the least effective method for getting a job,” Mike said.

Respondents to the survey also expressed overwhelming frustration and disappointment at the job application and response process. Less than one percent of the 3000 people surveyed had a positive response.

Topics:  careers employment job seekers robots technology


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